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Three meals a day in Timor-Leste

2014 July 22

Judith used to face extreme hunger and her daughter was showing signs of malnutrition. Since receiving seeds, tools and training from CARE, she is now leader of a farmers’ group and her family is able to eat three meals a day.  

In Timor-Leste, Judith and her family used to face extreme hunger. Her three-year-old daughter Melia* was showing signs of malnutrition – yellowing hair, dull eyes and dizziness. Judith was only able to provide two meals a day for her family, despite spending long days working in the field with her husband.

Judith and Melia

Judith and her family used to face extreme hunger. ©Tom Greenwood/CARE

Our team visited Judith recently, and thanks to the support of our donors we have a very different story to report. Now, Judith is the leader of a farmers’ group and has received maize and vegetable seeds, training and storage drums.

‘I use the maize to feed my family,’ says Judith.

‘I feel happy as in the past the crops were not very good but now, because of the project, the crops are bringing good results and yields have increased. I’m happy as in the past I used to have to buy vegetables for my family but now I have my own.

‘We now cook three meals a day; we eat breakfast, lunch and dinner.’

Judith

Now, Judith and her family are able to eat three meals a day. ©CARE

Judith and her farmers’ group members sell their excess crops and share the profit.

‘I try to save the money I make from the vegetables so I can pay school fees, buy shoes, books and pens.’

Most importantly, Melia’s health is now improving.

‘I’m happy that my children are now more healthy,’ Judith says with a smile on her face. ‘They are fatter and are not getting sick as much.’

Help more families like Judith’s fight hunger – donate to CARE’s Hunger Appeal

*CARE is committed to being a child safe organisation. Names of children have been changed.

Eyewitness account from Gaza

2014 July 19
by careaustralia

by Saaed Al Madhoun, Program Officer, CARE International West Bank and Gaza

My boy is only three years old. He feels stressed and depressed and last night after hearing the explosions he said to my wife, ‘I feel that I will die.’

He is only three years old. It makes us so sad. It was such a terrible surprise to hear him say this, we feel very bad. He says he is feeling sick because of the noise of the explosions. He is crying at night and cannot sleep, so my wife and I try to massage him to calm him down.

Saaed Al Madhoun with his son

CARE’s Saaed Al Madhoun with his son in Gaza. ©CARE

My wife is very afraid for the children. She is able to feed my five-month-old baby but it is stressful.  We feel that there is no safe place; any movement outside and you could be targeted. If I go to my brother’s house, are we any safer there?

The water gets cut off when there is no electricity. I’m trying to keep reserves of water, we need to be able to sterilise things for the baby when we can.

I left the home to do some shopping during the ceasefire, to get some basics for my kids. We have just a short period of time before it starts again. It was very crowded in the streets because of the limited time. The prices were normal but there was not very much available.

I also went to check on the CARE office to see that it was OK. I want to go back to work to help support all of the vulnerable people, I am more than happy to do this but it is difficult because we cannot move without being targeted.

If this situation continues like now it will be a real crisis. We don’t know when it will finish. I am really hoping for a long-term ceasefire and that it will calm down.

It’s hard for my family, for my friends and colleagues, for all Gazans to live in this crisis. We just hope it will end soon. In six years there have been three wars. It’s difficult for all of us, but especially the children.

I ask the world, and all of the humanitarian community to try to make a ceasefire that will last for years not hours. We ask that the violence stops. We cannot continue living in this situation, but we also cannot leave Gaza.

We ask the world to make it stop and do their best for the people of Gaza. It is enough now.

Learn more about CARE’s work in Gaza

Fighting hunger in Malawi

2014 July 18

by Lyrian Fleming-Parsley, CARE Australia

When my colleagues first met Edda in rural Malawi in 2012, her situation was dire. She and the four grandchildren she cares for had been sleeping in a neighbour’s kitchen for a month because their home collapsed.

‘When the house began falling down around us I didn’t know what to do or who to turn to,’ explained Edda.

Edda is a subsistence farmer, which means she grows most of the food her family eats. She grows maize, cotton and peanuts, but without fertiliser she couldn’t grow enough food to feed her family.

‘Life is hard for me and the grandchildren,’ she told us. ‘I try to do the best for my family, but it’s impossible for me to provide food all year round.’

To raise the $50 needed to repair her home, she spent months working in other people’s fields instead of tending to her own small farm.

She said: ‘I feel angry and upset that this has happened to me. I don’t really want to start over, but I have no choice. I’m ashamed that I don’t have a safe, warm house for my family.’

Edda and her grandchildren

Edda and her grandchildren sit inside their destroyed home in 2012. ©Josh Estey/CARE

Sadly, Edda’s situation is common in Malawi, where rural poverty is high, food insecurity is widespread and women lack social and economic support.

‘I fear hunger,’ she told us. ‘Many households in this village find it difficult to grow enough food and every year we manage to get through the lean season [the period between food running out and the next harvest], but I worry what next year will bring. I am tired of living miserably and I dream of a better life – one where we have a good house, enough food and the children go to school.’

It was around this time in 2012 that CARE began working with Edda and her community to support women who struggle to provide food all year round.

‘CARE’s arrival in our village couldn’t have come at a better time. My children are hungry and sick and I had almost given-up on farming because very little grows from the land anymore, but the winds of change have arrived and now I have hope again.’

A lot has grown from that hope in two years…

I travelled to Malawi in January, and the Edda I spoke to was strong and tenacious. She has been saving money regularly through a Village Savings and Loans group CARE established, and with the money saved so far, she has bought rabbits, a pig, pigeons and chickens to breed and sell.

‘My animals are an investment so when they grow up and I need something for the house, I can sell them,’ says Edda proudly.

Edda and her grandchildren 2014

Edda and her grandchildren now live in a temporary home while she is saving to build a new one. She has also bought livestock and fertiliser with income she is earning through the project. ©Josh Estey/CARE

She has also learnt small business skills through the project, and put them to good use selling local snack food in her village.

‘I have been trained in business, how to set it up, and how to run the business. This has helped my business, has helped me buy some things like maize and meat,’ she explains.

The best news is that the family is eating more now. It is the lean season again, a period when her family used to suffer with just one meal per day. Yet Edda’s farm is doing better than ever, now that she is applying her new farming skills. Now, the family are eating two meals of maize porridge with vegetable leaves a day instead of one. Sometimes, they are able to add kidney beans to their meal too.

The change in Edda’s life is significant. In just two years, her children are eating more food more often, and are not as susceptible to grave risks of hunger. Edda is also able to use the
profits from her small business activities and the money she saves through the Village Savings and Loans Group to provide the things her grandchildren need to go to school, including uniforms, school books and soap.

Edda and her grandchildren are eating more food more often

Edda and her grandchildren are now eating more food more often, and are not as susceptible to grave risks of hunger. ©Josh Estey/CARE

With more food on the table, more opportunities to earn an income and support her family, and with her newly learned skills in savings, spending and small business, Edda is in a better position than ever before to escape the cycle of extreme poverty and hunger.

Now, Edda looks to the future with excitement instead of worry.

‘I expect to get bumper yields [of maize] this year compared to last year… This year I plan to save 10-15,000 kwacha ($30-40) and will spend the money on fertiliser and food,’ Edda says of her plans.

Thanks to CARE’s supporters, around 15,000 people like Edda, across two districts in Malawi are being supported through this project. They are receiving training in reading and writing, financial literacy, saving and budgeting, modern farming techniques, crop management and nutrition in order to overcome hunger, improve their family’s health and deliver previously unimaginable opportunities.

Thank you for making this change possible, for Edda, and millions of people like her around the world.

Donate to CARE’s Hunger Appeal or learn more about work in Malawi

Meet an original CARE package recipient

2014 July 18
by careaustralia

Ingrid Hurtubise and her family received a CARE package after WWII. ‘I was young, maybe 5 years old, but I remember there was butter in this magical package’

I was 4 years old when the Second World War ended. My family lived on Sylt, a German island in the North Sea where my father’s cousin had a farm. Life after the war was hard. There was little work, hardly any food to buy, no coal and little wood to heat the two-room former ammunition depot that had become our home in Sylt. We ate herring and had black bread. Once my father brought home a barrel of oranges he found floating in the sea. They were salty from the sea water, but we ate them anyway.

Original CARE Package Recipient Ingrid Hurtubise

Original CARE Package Recipient Ingrid Hurtubise

It was around this time that a parcel arrived at our home. It was a CARE Package, one of 100 million similar packages of food and other vital supplies donated by Americans to people in need around the world, starting with Europeans devastated by the war. I was young, maybe 5 years old, but I remember there was butter in this magical package from an organization called CARE and a green translucent toothbrush for my sister, which she cherished for years. We loved it. There was also cornbread, which my sister and I had never had before and didn’t like the taste. Even hungry kids can be unreasonably picky when they encounter unfamiliar foods.

I was only a small child. I didn’t understand the war or its causes, but my mother explained to us just how special it was that strangers from a country against which our country had just fought a war were making such a kind gesture. And I didn’t need my mother to explain to me how nice it felt to receive something when you have almost nothing.

My life is very different today. I live comfortably in Atlanta (which, as fate would have it, is now the headquarters for CARE). I’m a business owner, a mother and a grandmother. And thanks to a recipe I got from a Georgia-born friend, I even love cornbread. But part of me is still that little girl whose heart was touched by the generosity and kindness of a far-away stranger; someone who saw beyond nationality and global politics to extend a hand to a family in need.

I know that today there are girls much like me around the world who, because of circumstances beyond their control, live in squalor. Some have fled fighting in places such as Syria or the Democratic Republic of the Congo, finding temporary homes wherever they can. Perhaps those girls, decades from now, also will be able to look back fondly at people in a far-away place called America who reached as deeply into their pockets as they could to help them in their time of need.

Read more about the history of CARE

Ingrid (third from left) with her family on Sylt.

Ingrid (third from left) with her family on Sylt.

The escalation of violence in West Bank/Gaza

2014 July 16
by careaustralia

Father of five Mostafa Kahlout is a CARE Economic Empowerment Program coordinator in Gaza. His role involves helping more than 8,000 vulnerable households in Gaza to access food and earn an income, mostly through small scale farming. Mostafa and his family live in Gaza, and have barely left the house since the Israeli military operation began last week.

We are surrounded by bombs and explosions. Our nights have become days and our days have become nights, as we can hardly sleep more than an hour or so without the explosions. We just stay in the house and keep watching what is happening outside, watching the black smoke in the sky when the houses nearby are hit.

It is really a sad and terrible situation for all of the people of Gaza, including my own family. My kids are suffering a lot. I have two boys and three girls aged from 7 to 21-years-old.

In front of my kids and family, I act like I am not scared, so they don’t feel so stressed and depressed, but of course I am very worried and afraid. I am scared for the life of my kids and wife, relatives, and our home.

My daughters are already traumatised from the previous military operations on Gaza. Even before the bombs fall they would shiver and come close to their mother or me whenever they hear a plane.

Naimah Abu Halima sits with her daughter Hannah in a UN school after fleeing from the north of Gaza following a warning from the Israeli Defence Forces (IDF). Over 600 people have evacuated their homes and taken refuge in the school. Hannah is disabled and cannot feed or wash herself and her mother must continue to care for her in the temporary shelter. With no sign of the crisis ending the school is now concerned that they will run out of water and supplies. "I don't know how much longer we will be able to go on in this situation." Commented Abdil Sawan, the UN representative within the school. Image: Alison Baskerville

Naimah Abu Halima sits with her daughter Hannah in a UN school after fleeing from the north of Gaza following a warning from the Israeli Defence Forces (IDF). Over 600 people have evacuated their homes and taken refuge in the school. Hannah is disabled and cannot feed or wash herself and her mother must continue to care for her in the temporary shelter. With no sign of the crisis ending the school is now concerned that they will run out of water and supplies. “I don’t know how much longer we will be able to go on in this situation.” Commented Abdil Sawan, the UN representative within the school. Image: Alison Baskerville

My youngest daughter is nearly eight, she’s only small and she just keeps looking at the ceiling and asking ‘why are they trying to kill us?’

I say to her: ‘No one is going to kill us; it will all be over soon,’  trying to calm her down. But I don’t know when it will be over.

My boys put their hands to their ears to block out the noise and sit close with us. You wouldn’t believe the sound, the noise is very terrible.

I have only left the house a few times to get food from the market. The kids might go to the close neighbours’ houses but they rush back every time they hear the planes.

All the wars have been terrible, but the bombing, the shooting, the missiles, the shelling into houses this time, is just too much. It’s everywhere. Everyone feels targeted.  I am part of a big family in Gaza, and we have heard that a relative has been killed. I have lost friends and my daughter’s friend is in hospital, injured.

My children have lived through three wars in six years. I want them to live and sleep in peace without worry or trauma. They want a childhood. They deserve a childhood.

It feels quite hopeless in Gaza even without war – unemployment is so high, Israeli siege and closures, there is no stability, just violence. It’s a very difficult life indeed.

This is the worst Holy month (Ramadan) we have ever known. We are fasting, and worried and scared and we don’t know if we will find food to break the fast. And even when we do go to break the fast there might be bombing and shelling so we hide. If there is electricity we watch TV for updates, instead of celebrating the time together as a family like we usually would. When we get up early in the morning to prepare for the fast, again we hear the shelling and it is very hard.

Right now it is difficult for CARE, we cannot reach people to support them because we cannot move. Any moving car in the street could be targeted. My main concern is a shortage of food and medicine. There are so many casualties, injuries, destruction of lands and houses, and even before the war started, supplies were low due to the blockade. Now I worry that they will run out completely.

When this finishes we will have so many people to help. Our priority will be those whose homes and livelihoods have been destroyed. Even small funds will help make a difference to them.

The people in Gaza feel isolated, there does not seem to be strong support from other countries to push for a ceasefire but as long as there is war it is civilians who will pay the price.

Right now it feels like our destiny is unknown, particularly with the Israeli closures and movement restriction imposed on Gaza since 2007. We don’t understand what will happen next, it is out of our hands. But hope never dies. We will always have hope. We want to live in peace.

Following a warning from the Israeli Defence Forces (IDF) over 600 people have evacuated their homes from the north of Gaza and taken refuge in a UN School. Many left with limited supplies. With no sign of the crisis ending the school is now concerned that they will run out of water and supplies. "I don't know how much longer we will be able to go on in this situation." Commented Abdil Sawan, the UN representative within the school. Image: Alison Baskerville

Following a warning from the Israeli Defence Forces (IDF) over 600 people have evacuated their homes from the north of Gaza and taken refuge in a UN School. Many left with limited supplies. With no sign of the crisis ending the school is now concerned that they will run out of water and supplies. “I don’t know how much longer we will be able to go on in this situation.” Commented Abdil Sawan, the UN representative within the school. Image: Alison Baskerville

‘From Child Soldier to Peace Builder’

2014 July 10

Blog by Simon Chol Mialith, CARE South Sudan, Peace Building and Conflict Mitigation Coordinator

‘I come from Panriang County of Unity State in South Sudan, an area that is rich of oil and where, in fact, about 50 percent of our oil reserves get explored. In 1987, when I was in my early teenage years, I joined the Sudan People’s Liberation Army/ Movement (SPLM/A). At that time, a lot of innocent Sudanese civilians particularly from Southern Sudan suffered from years of attacks on their villages, bombings and fighting. I grew up in a country that had already experienced two decades of war – conflict was all I knew. I wanted to join the liberation struggle for South Sudan; I could not stand the violence anymore and hoped that one day I could live in a free and peaceful country. I became a child soldier.

Me, and a lot of other children of the same age walked from the south of Sudan to Ethiopia, where the SPLM/A base was. We walked for three months. I then spent five years in Ethiopia and after the fall of Mengistu Haile Mariam, the former President of Ethiopia in 1991, we flew back to South Sudan. At this point, I also realized that fighting would not help my country and left the SPLA and seek education opportunities. Making things worse, our return coincided with the split of the SPLA into two groups. These were the most destructive moments in the history of the South Sudanese struggle for freedom, when both parts of the liberation movement turned against each other. This split divided two of the main tribes in South Sudan, the Dinka and the Nuer. Both started fighting against each other and that divide lasts until today. It is one of the reasons why it continues to be so difficult to bring a stable peace to our country.

However, that time also proved a turning point in my life. I got an opportunity to go to the Kakuma Refugee Camp in North Western Kenya, where I could attend school for the first time in my life. It was very tough: the area was dusty and very hot, I had little food to eat and I had neither parents nor relatives to provide moral and material support to me. I came to Kenya with many other child soldiers. We became known as the “Lost Boys”.

However, suffering was nothing new to me. I have seen and experienced it before, so I stayed strong. Finishing my education was my only wish. Why? Because I wanted to contribute to building my nation one day; I was waiting for the day when peace would finally come to South Sudan. That was my motivation. At that time, I saw many of my school comrades leaving for the United States of America where they get resettled. I still have contact with some of them, via email, Facebook or Skype.

After finishing my education, I felt that I needed to join the humanitarian world to save the lives of poor people and help the victims of violence and conflict. I especially wanted to contribute to peace building and conflict resolution. Given my personal experience, I believe that there can’t be development without peace. Conflict destroys lives, livelihoods, it devastates a whole country.  So I finally turned my life around from being a child soldier to becoming a peace builder.

For nine years, I have worked with national and International organizations in South Sudan and outside South Sudan at senior positions. Today I work with CARE South Sudan as Peace Building and Conflict Mitigation Coordinator. I train CARE staff on “DO NO HARM” principles and give technical support to our peace building officers. In practice, this means that we need to assess carefully the potential conflicts we could create when implementing a project. CARE works in areas that are still very insecure, where fighting between tribes occur daily. So for example, we need to ensure that we are not seen as assisting one tribe in favor of another. We need to be aware of all these sensitive aspects of conflict, so we don’t accidentally create violence. We also help communities settling conflicts, training them in reconciliation methods and setting up peace committees in villages. We as CARE have been working with some of these communities for a long time, they know us and accept our assistance.

I believe that almost five decades of war and conflict had deep impacts on the South Sudanese population. People are traumatized, scared and angry. When people only know conflict, it is difficult for them to transfer to a peaceful society. It takes time to heal the scars. So we have a lot of work ahead of us to build a peaceful and stable South Sudan.’

Read more about CARE’s work in South Sudan

South Sudan: Hope for the future

2014 July 9

Donate to CARE’s South Sudan Appeal

‘There’s so much suffering, so many sad stories. And then there are people who are looking to the future. They are thinking about what they can do to get themselves on their feet and push forward. These are the people who will be on the front line of getting back to their homes and rebuilding this country.’

Aimee Ansari reflects on the third anniversary of the world’s newest country, South Sudan.

by Aimee Ansari, CARE’s Country Director in South Sudan

Aimee Ansari

Aimee Ansari, CARE’s Country Director in South Sudan ©CARE

Our ‘office’ in Bentiu consists of nothing more than five desks. CARE occupies half a trailer and shares the tiny space with two other organisations, but others ‘camp’ in here whenever there is an empty chair. Right now, we are 14 people with 13 chairs, supporting the operations of five organisations. The desks are standard small desks. The chairs are a mish-mash of broken office chairs, plastic chairs and a funky red faux leather and chrome chair that I love, but is very unstable. The red one is currently occupied by our nutrition program manager. I’m on the chair with the seat that falls off if you don’t balance on it correctly.

We are all currently based in the UN Protection of Civilians site. It’s a place of protection for those who are fleeing from the terrible violence that has displaced over a million people in South Sudan and affected over five million people’s ability to get food. The UN sites around the country currently house over 100,000 people. We know that this is just one-tenth of the people affected. But we haven’t been able to regularly reach the others. Most people have moved to places where they feel safe, out of the way of warring parties to remote places where soldiers can’t harm them. Aid workers find it difficult to help them – they live in marshy swampy areas along the rivers or deep in the thick of 2-meter-high elephant grass. Now that the fighting has calmed in some areas around Bentiu, people are finally able to come to seek assistance. And some are coming in terrible states, hardly able to walk.

 

Hundreds of people crowd a space just inside the gate of the UN mission in Bentiu

Hundreds of people crowd a space just inside the gate of the UN mission in Bentiu amid rumours of an imminent attack on the town. ©Dan Alder/CARE

Angelina, a single mother with two small children, had walked from morning to night to get to the UN site in Bentiu.  She and her children had been eating grass because that was all the food they had. Still, life in the PoC – where she has been for seven days with only minimal water and shelter, and a small mat to sit on – is better. At least there is food for her children.

Most days, the daily life in Bentiu is horrific and beyond imagination. A few days ago, CARE helped parents transport the bodies of three children who had died from malnutrition to a burial site. The CARE team in Bentiu is working seven days a week in some of the most difficult conditions I’ve experienced – the office is luxurious compared to the living conditions for our team, most of whom are displaced themselves in the PoC site. They work in knee deep mud, our local staff have floods in their homes when it rains, and there is very limited water available for drinking, cleaning, cooking. One staff member told me she was lucky if her family gets ten litres of water per day.

We are providing health, nutrition and sanitation to people who have fled into the UN sites. Although they are tired, although they are affected by the violence and the terrible conditions themselves, the team is extremely motivated. They work hard, long hours. They are amazing.

I’ve been here in Bentiu for three days and the team is telling me that we’re not doing enough. They want to do more and help more people. It is sometimes unsafe outside of the UN areas, but that’s where the people in real need are – that’s where the people who can’t walk to the UN sites are. How can we help them? How can CARE overcome the security concerns and get to the villages to encourage people to return to them? The team is challenging me to help them find innovate solutions to overwhelming problems.

 

Over a million people have fled their homes to escape recent political violence in South Sudan.

Over one million people have fled their homes to escape recent political violence in South Sudan. ©Dan Alder/CARE

In a small hut, I met five families living together. They had travelled far. The children were making cows from mud – true artists. Two of their siblings, a boy and a girl were lying on mats, suffering from malnutrition. They are in a CARE program to help them to recover. When I asked the mothers if they would return to their villages, they said they would never return. They didn’t trust the soldiers. Their husbands were gone, probably either fighting or dead.

One of our team, an energetic, ambitious, articulate woman, asked me if there would be anything to help people return to their homes and start their lives again. She works for CARE to help people, to learn, and, most of all, to earn money so she can go back to school. Her house was burned down in the fighting. Could we give her a tent once it got safe?, she asked. Just until she could re-build her house?

Meeting people like her gives me hope for the future of this country. There’s so much suffering, so many sad stories. And then there are people who are looking to the future. They are thinking about what they can do to get themselves on their feet and push forward. These are the people who will be on the front line of getting back to their homes and rebuilding this country. It is for her that I sleep in tents, walk through the mud to get to work, and work in the office until 10pm. Because if I can do something that helps her get an education, then I can contribute to helping all of South Sudan. And maybe someday she will work in a safer environment – with a proper chair.

Donate to CARE’s South Sudan Appeal

South Sudan: ‘Raping women as punishment’

2014 June 23

You can support CARE’s work

by Aimee Ansari, CARE’s Country Director in South Sudan

Aimee Ansari, CARE’s Country Director in South Sudan

Aimee Ansari, CARE’s Country Director in South Sudan

Sometimes when I give an interview, I have to turn off the part of my brain that analyses what I’m saying.  The implications of what I’m telling are too devastating: 64 reported cases of gender based violence in a protection area just within a week.  I’ve experienced different kinds of harassment and violence personally – I’ve been mugged in Paris, stalked in Egypt, and put in very uncomfortable situations that female aid workers sometimes find themselves in.  But I can’t fathom 64 cases in an area that women have fled to be ‘protected’.

Many years ago, I worked in Kyrgyzstan.  One large donor threatened to stop aid to the country until the government took positive and proactive steps to stop violence against women.  I was thrilled.  A donor finally taking the problem seriously was music to my ears.  And, to some extent, it worked.

Sadly, I doubt that stopping assistance to South Sudan would have the same positive impact it had in Kyrgyzstan.  Here, violence against women is not only socially acceptable; women are also being told that raping them is their punishment for supporting one side of the conflict or the other.  It’s a psychological tool of the conflict.  Stopping assistance won’t help.

It’s hard to know what will work to stop these terrible acts against women’s bodies and souls.  Certainly, we NGOs and UN agencies could and should be doing more by speaking openly about the problem, by providing services to women, ensuring that those services are of high quality, widely available and accessible to the most vulnerable.  Our recently published report ‘THE GIRL HAS NO RIGHTS’: Gender-Based Violence in South Sudan shows CARE and other NGOs are already doing some of this.  We have medical post-rape trauma kits in many of the health facilities we support.  And we work with community health workers to provide PEP (Post Exposure Prophylaxis) kits, which includes preventive medicine helping women to avoid an HIV infection.

The UN peacekeeping mission, given its new focus on protection, could also be doing more.  I know they are planning to increase their protection activities, but the UN Mission has thus far demonstrated limited capacity to support the peacekeepers to appropriately address violence against women and girls.  Simple things like placing adequate lighting around latrines, so that women aren’t raped at night would go a long way.  Or doing foot patrols with civilians who are women and who speak the local language would help the peacekeepers to better understand issues and communicate to people how they can help protect them.

But addressing violence in the designated protection areas is, in a way, the easy part.

Last week, I visited a CARE program in a fairly remote, but very (militarily) strategic location.  The market has been taken over by soldiers.  When they get paid, they get drunk and most shops just close.  Our staff told me that a woman had been raped and then killed just behind our compound for reasons that they didn’t understand.  The head of the County Administration told me that he knew that rape cases had increased as a result of military build-up, but he didn’t know what he could do about it.  He said he didn’t have a lot of control over the military.  He said he was happy to get any support we could provide.

In one clinic, I spoke to a woman with a one-month old baby.  The baby already had signs of malaria and malnutrition.  The child probably won’t survive.  The woman was getting very little nutrition herself – the men had left with the cattle in search of pasture.  She was getting very little milk and almost no food.  The clinical officer did what he could; and maybe the woman would return for further treatment.  But, given the military concentrations in the area, we all doubted she would risk her life again to return.  Coming back, she may face the threat of physical violence and harassment from men in uniform. It is sadly unlikely that her small girl will survive the combination of malaria and malnutrition.

The good news is we’re getting better at documenting and analysing the scope of the threats women face in this conflict.  But this is only the very tip of the iceberg.  At least, rape and assault cases are now being reported to us by the women. Recent CARE research found that only 57 percent of women tell others about a violation; as a result, no one really knows the true scale of the issues.  So, if there were 64 reported cases in that one area, we could expect that 130 women faced some form of violence last week.  Understanding the magnitude of these abuses remains a great challenge, but at least we now have some of the necessary documentation – that’s the first step in being able to address the issues and really start helping women to be protected.

You can support CARE’s work

In Mozambique, Farmer Field Schools help vulnerable communities tackle the impacts of climate change

2014 June 20

By Karl Deering, CARE International’s Climate Change Coordinator for Africa. This post is part of a series produced by The Chicago Council on Global Affairs, marking the occasion of its fifth Global Food Security Symposium 2014 in Washington, D.C., which was held on May 22.

In March 2013, rain fell in Namizope and Mukuvula communities in Angoche District, Nampula in Northern Mozambique until the water was almost up to people’s knees, inundating fields and crops. With entire harvests of cassava washed away, the impact for some was catastrophic. However, after the rains, Mwancha Amisse and her husband, smallholder farmers in Mukuvula community, saw how a number of their plots responded differently to the flooding in terms of water flow, erosion, and moisture absorption.

They noticed that plots where farmers had implemented conservation agriculture techniques performed far better in the flood than other fields. Those techniques, learned through a CARE-supported Farmer Field School, have increased the capacity of poor smallholder farmers in coastal Mozambique to manage increasingly erratic weather – just one of the impacts of a changing climate.

The coastal area of Mozambique is a challenging environment for smallholder farming. Soils are mostly sandy with low fertility, and rainfall is unpredictable, causing drought and floods. Cyclones are another hazard. However, farming is still the main source of food and livelihood for most rural families and there is good potential for smallholder farmers to improve yields, their family’s nutrition, and their resilience.

This is why CARE Mozambique has been working with local partners AENA (National Association of Rural Extension), Mahlahle (a local NGO), and the Ministry of Agriculture to improve farming practices and productivity in Nampula and Inhambane provinces.

Mozambique farmers

Mwancha Amisse and her husband, farmers in the Mukuvula community. ©Ausi Petrelius/CARE

New techniques and more productive and disease tolerant crop varieties are being introduced through a participatory approach to research and extension services called Farmer Field Schools. Farmer Field Schools guide farmers to undertake practical experiments and side-by-side comparisons between common farming techniques and conservation agriculture practices.

Farmers test different varieties and arrangements of crops for yield, flavor, and disease resistance. They then select those that are most appropriate for their own situations, giving them more control of their land and produce in difficult and changing situations. As they gain experience in running and analyzing their own experiments, farmers build confidence and deepen their capacity to adapt to economic and environmental changes.

So what is conservation agriculture? Put simply, it helps farmers to mimic – rather than control – nature through minimal soil tillage, year-round soil cover of organic matter, and increased diversity of planted crops. Conservation agriculture builds organic matter, improves the soil’s structure, reduces erosion, helps water soak into the soil more quickly, and reduces water loss through evaporation, all while improving fertility and productivity. This is vital, especially given climate change impacts, with higher temperatures, more erratic rainfall, and bursts of torrential rainfall alternating with prolonged dry spells that bake the soil hard. This combination of conservation agriculture, and more suitable plant varieties, is leading to greater productivity, contributing to an increase in dietary diversity and enhanced food and nutrition security.

Before the rains in March 2013, and based on her experiences at a local Farmer Field School, Mwancha Amisse added layers of dry grass to increase the soil’s capacity to absorb water, and to reduce run-off and erosion. Following the heavy rains, she found that the layers of dry grass had significantly reduced topsoil erosion compared to areas where it hadn’t been applied. Erosion also decreased – while water absorption increased – in plots where farmers had used minimum tilling. While conservation agriculture is often seen as a way of mitigating the impacts of drought, these outcomes showed that it can also mitigate the impact of floods.

Which is why, in addition to using soil cover to improve moisture retention and sowing more plant varieties to spread their risk, the women of Wiwanana Wa Tiane Agriculture Association in Namizope have also decided to incorporate drainage systems in their fields. ‘We are going to be sure to include a way for water to flow out of our fields, but in ways where our crops will not be washed away with it,’ said the Association’s president, Alima Chereira.

Farmer Field Schools’ emphasis on farmers as decision-makers helps rural communities, and especially women, to build their confidence and capacity to experiment, while also helping people to improve their farming potential.

In the words of Mwancha Amisse: ‘We learned in the Farmer Field School that we don’t have to do agriculture as it has always been done. We learned that we can do it differently.’

World Day Against Child Labour: ‘If I would not work my family would not survive’

2014 June 12

12 June marks International Day against Child Labour.

With every passing day the number of Syrian refugee children being pulled out of school and into the workforce rises. Nearly 600,000 refugees in Jordan and 1.1 million refugees in Lebanon are struggling to cope with rising costs of living. A recent survey by CARE revealed that 90 per cent of refugees in Jordan are in debt to relatives, neighbours, shopkeepers or landlords, with rental costs having increased by almost a third in the past year. In Jordan, the government estimates that 60,000 children are working to support their families.

‘In a lot of cases young sons have to earn the income for the family in order to survive,’ says Salam Kanaan, Country Director for CARE Jordan. ‘It is an easy equation: The longer refugee families live in neighbouring countries, the more financially vulnerable and destitute they become. With no more assets and no male head of household who could work, children have to contribute to cover the monthly expenses and have to quit school.’

 

Hani, 14, works every day from 7 am to 10 pm. In between he goes to school. He says: "I would prefer to go to school and learn something. But for now I am proud to support my parents, my brother and my two sisters. Without me, we could not survive."

Hani, 14, works every day from 7 am to 10 pm. In between he goes to school. He says: ‘I would prefer to go to school and learn something. But for now I am proud to support my parents, my brother and my two sisters. Without me, we could not survive.’

Hani,* 14, works every day from 7 am to 10 pm. In between, he goes to school. His father is ill and has trouble finding a job. The family fled from Homs two years ago. Hani has already worked in a coffee shop, in a mall and in a restaurant. He now works in a bakery. He misses his best friend in Syria. He has not heard from him for the past two years. He says: ‘I would prefer to go to school and learn something. But for now I am proud to support my parents, my brother and my two sisters. Without me, we could not survive.’ (Photo: CARE/Johanna Mitscherlich)

 

To support his family Aboud works in a vegetable store 12 hours every day.

To support his family Aboud works in a vegetable store 12 hours every day. When he first arrived, he could hardly lift the vegetable boxes. Aboud wants to go back to school to become an engineer.

Aboud* does not say a lot. Sitting on a green box with holes, he plucks styrofoam from a package. His big brown eyes are staring at the white flakes as they fall onto the ground. His father Hamid explains: ‘During the last three months in Homs we had nothing to eat. We collected leftovers from the street and searched the trash cans for food that was thrown away. The past two years were a nightmare.’ First their house was looted and then someone set it on fire. But then their house was destroyed by a bomb and the family had to flee. They walked for 11 days from Homs to the Jordanian border. They had to hide behind trees and were forced to watch as two of their uncles were kidnapped and their aunt raped and then shot. Aboud starts his work in the vegetable store at 8am and finishes at 8pm. He drags cases from the back of the shop to refill the stalls. He has only one dream. ‘I want to go back. I miss my best friends. I want to go back to school to become an engineer and rebuild Homs.’ (Photo: CARE/Johanna Mitscherlich)

 

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Mohamed is 12 years old. He fled to Mafraq in the North of Syria six weeks ago. To make ends meet he and his 13 year old brother work in a barber shop from 9 in the morning and works until 10:30 at night.

Mohamed* is 12 years old. He fled to Mafraq in the North of Jordan half a year ago. To help his family make ends meet both he and his 13 year old brother have to work. He starts his job in a barber shop at 9am and works until 10.30pm at night. He sweeps the floor and cleans the scissors. He earns around $7 per week. He says that he sometimes gets very dizzy when he has to stand all day, but his family cannot afford more than one or two meals every day. (Photo: CARE/Johanna Mitscherlich)

 

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Khaled is 13 years old and works long hours every day to support his family.

Khaled*, 13, fled to Syria with his family. He works in a coffee shop in the town of Chhime in Lebanon. He has been working ever since his family fled from a village outside Damascus. His father is unable to work because of a heart condition. Without Khaled, his parents and four siblings could not survive. His father said: ‘We would prefer if he would go to school. He is too young to work and we do not want to depend on him. But we are in an impossible situation.’ In Syria, his father had a good job in the tourism industry. The family had a big house and a car. But after his father was arrested and detained, his health condition deteriorated and the family had to flee to Lebanon. Khaled says: ‘If I don’t work who is going to provide for my family?’ (Photo: CARE/Harry Chun)

 

Abu was very happy to buy a new pair of jeans, flip-flops, shirt, socks and sneakers.

Yousef works in a bakery every day from 5 o’clock in the morning until 4 o’clock in the afternoon. He earns around 33 US Dollar every month. ‘My parents are old and sick. They cannot work. If I did not work, we would not be able to survive.’

Yousef* fled Syria three years ago when the war started. A former school in Lebanon has become his new home, where he lives together with his parents and younger brother. Yousef was just nine years old when he left Syria. He says that he misses his home, but the memory of Syria is fading. He does not have time to remember. He works in a bakery every day from 5am until 4pm. He earns around $35 every month. ‘My parents are old and sick. They cannot work. If I did not work, we would not be able to survive.’ What does Yousef wish for? ‘I wish I could die, because I am tired of this life, there is nothing positive or joyful in living like this. When I was in Syria, my friends and I used to fantasise about how life would be when we grew up to become teenage boys and men. Nowadays I sit by myself laughing about how I could even dare to have even dreamt about those things.’ (Photo: CARE/Racha El Daoi)

 

Six days a week, from 9 in the morning to 6 at night, Fadi (16) cleans bird cages, feeds the animals and sells them on the local market. He earns around four Euros every day, adding up to 96 Euros every month.

Six days a week, from 9 in the morning to 6 at night, Fadi (16) cleans bird cages, feeds the animals and sells them on the local market. He earns around four Euros every day, adding up to 96 Euros every month.

About a year ago, Fadi* was an average 15 year old boy. He attended high school, met his friends after class to practice break-dancing, played tricks on people from time to time and wanted to become an English teacher. As is the case for many other Syrian refugee families, it’s Fadi who contributes the greatest deal to the family’s earnings. Six days a week, from 9amto 6pm, he cleans birdcages, feeds animals and sells them at the local market. He earns around $5.70 a day, adding up to $137 each month. But Fadi misses his school and his friends. He misses learning and reading. ‘I am working because we don’t have another option to make ends meet. But in an ideal world, if life in Syria were still the way it should be, I would first finish my schooling and work afterwards. I should not be working full-time now. This is not how it should be.’ Once he can return to Syria he says he will cram for his exams night and day and get closer to achieving his goal of becoming an English teacher. ‘That would be awesome,’ he says in English and smiles proudly. (Photo: CARE/Johanna Mitscherlich)

 

In the downtown area of Bader works in a coffee shop.

Bader (14) works in a coffee shop. 14 hours a day, six days a week. When he starts his job at 6amhe cleans the shop, waits for customers and delivers coffee to nearby shops and gas stations. When he returns home from work at around 8pm he does not want to do anything but take a shower and watch Indian soap operas on TV.

‘I don’t like to think about Syria. It makes me sad.’ Bader* doesn’t have much time to think about Syria anyway. As the ‘man of the house’, he is expected to take care of his mother, Lina, and his seven siblings. He works in a coffee shop 14 hours a day, six days a week. Before leaving Syria, Khaled was shot in the leg and finds it hard to be on his feet all day. When their house was burnt down the family stayed in a bunker. After ten days they thought it was safe to return and rebuild it. Bader’s scarred leg still reminds them they were wrong. He was wounded when they tried to reach their home. His mother decided to flee to Jordan so her children would be safe. Bader said: ‘I am tired after work. My leg hurts, I cannot play soccer anymore. Going up and down the stairs to our apartment is as exhausting as running a marathon is for healthy people.’ (Photo: CARE/Johanna Mitscherlich)

 

Donate to CARE’s Syrian Refugee Crisis Appeal

 *CARE is committed to being a child safe organisation. Names of children have been changed.

Gender-based violence: a global epidemic requiring committed and effective action

2014 June 6
by careaustralia

By Sofia Sprechmann, Program Director, CARE International

Sofia-CAREViolence against women and girls is one of the worst global epidemics. Studies show that gender-based violence (GBV) accounts for as much death and ill-health in women aged 15-44 years as cancer does. It is a greater cause of ill-health than malaria and traffic accidents combined. One in three women will be raped, beaten, coerced into sex or otherwise abused in her lifetime. The shocking truth is that violence against women and girls takes place in all countries, in homes, workplaces, schools and communities

Addressing gender-based violence is complex.One of thechallenges is that it is often hidden from view. The same deeply entrenched social norms that give rise to GBV make it a private matter, something not to be discussed outside the family (or even within the family).  Often, it is also invisible to those experiencing the violence, because it is so deeply woven into how an individual understands who they are as a man or a woman and their place in society.  Since GBV is often hidden from view, perpetrators are rarely brought to justice. Even in countries where violence against women is prohibited under law, such acts can go unreported or unaddressed since society views GBV as acceptable and chooses to stigmatize and blame women survivors. Ending GBV therefore involves social change work at the deepest levels.

CARE has worked on addressing this abuse for 20 years.In 2013, CARE implemented programs in 23 countries to directly tackle GBV to reach nearly 320,000 people. In these countries, CARE also reached 800,000 people through strategies such as advocacy or media campaigns. Given CARE’s extensive work on addressing this abuse, we felt it was critical to take stock of the impact of our work and use the learning from our programs in Asia, Africa, Easter Europe, the Middle East and Latin America to strengthen our response to this global epidemic.  Our new report, Challenging Gender-based Violence Worldwide, analyses the impact of this work and how to build momentum to end the cycle of violence.  The report reviewed 50 program evaluations carried out from July 2011 to June 2013 and includes the results of a survey with our partners, who gave us their opinion about how to strengthen our actions to stop violence against women and girls.

The review of CARE’s programs has helped to identify successes and challenges. One of the most important findings from this review is that it is critical to scale-up innovative approaches to engage men and boys as part of comprehensive strategies to promote gender equality and GBV prevention. This can be achieved in several ways, such as integrating gender and violence into the national education curriculum or building a movement of male activists and role models for promoting non-violent male identities. From our programs we have also learned that it is central to enhance CARE’s support for establishing national GBV action plans involving participation of civil society (particularly women’s organizations and movements) and affected people. It is vital to call for global targets to reduce GBV to measure progress and promote accountability.

It is our commitment to use the learning from the review to work more effectively to end GBV through CARE’s future actions.  The report also intends to increase CARE’s accountability to governments and civil societies based on its program evidence. We believe strongly in the importance of transparency regarding our achievements, as well as our limitations.  We feel that this openness will enhance our relevance and legitimacy, and ultimately improve the future quality and impact of our work, which is so vital given the scale of GBV.

 “What are you saying – that being violent is something we inherit? Isn’t it something that we develop? This Bosnian teenage boy said it clearly. We all have a role to play in ensuring that we can build a world where everyone can live and thrive safely and free of violence. CARE is firmly committed to fighting poverty, injustice and violence.

Read the report: Challenging Gender-based Violence Worldwide: CARE’s Program Evidence: Strategies, Results and Impacts of Evaluation 2011-2013

 

For the people of Nissan Island, today is about survival

2014 June 5

by Ed Boydell, CARE Australia’s Climate Change Advisor

Today is World Environment Day. For the 7,000 people living on Nissan Island, a small coral atoll in the north-east of Papua New Guinea (PNG), it is a day of special significance.

World Environment Day is a call to action, a reminder of our shared responsibility for protecting the planet. This year, the day is highlighting the impact that the climate change is having on small islands, where the poorest depend on a fragile environment for food and water. Climate change is adding to the challenges for the people who call small islands home.

Helen Kemito

Nissan Island resident Helen Kemito, a 48-year-old grandmother who is working with her community to address the impacts of climate change. ©Ed Boydell/CARE

The people on Nissan Island, part of the Autonomous Bougainville Region of PNG, are no strangers to these challenges. Nissan is surrounded by ocean as far as the eye can see. A five-hour boat trip away from mainland Bougainville Island, it is a beautiful but challenging place to call home. The low-lying island has limited fertile land, and is exposed to fierce storms and drought.

When I recently travelled to Nissan, I met Helen Kemito, a 48-year-old mother-of-five, and grandmother-of-four. She told me of the impact the increasingly unpredictable weather is having on her family’s lives.

With no access to reliable transport on and off the island, the people of Nissan depend almost solely on the island environment itself for food. They fish and grow garden crops such as taro, yam and cassava, along with fruits such as bananas, pawpaw and coconut. In the past decade, however, they have noticed increasing variation in the weather. Heavy rain falls in short periods, rotting vegetables and stripping the blossoms off fruit trees. Conversely, prolonged periods without rain are equally damaging to crops and bush foods. Sea spray is blowing further inland on strong winds, and heavier king tides bring salt further into their gardens than the people of Nissan have ever seen, severely damaging crops.

Raised Garden Bed

A raised garden bed, an example of new gardening and agriculture methods that the community in Nissan Island are putting in place to be better prepared for natural disasters. ©Andrea Dekrout/CARE

With support from CARE, Helen has led a small group of Nissan Islanders aiming to address some of the impacts they are already seeing from a changing climate. Part of an Australian Government initiative to ensure families continue to have enough food in the face of a changing climate, men and women on Nissan and neighbouring Pinipel islands are learning new agricultural, water and food storage techniques, and are building their skills to better prepare for disasters. Many families on Nissan have already built nurseries to trial new gardening and agriculture methods and are sharing their knowledge and seedlings among their community.

Nissan Islanders Group

Helen has led a group of Nissan Islanders aiming to address some of the impacts they are already seeing from a changing climate. ©Ed Boydell/CARE

In the face of an uncertain future, today’s World Environment Day is an opportunity for many hundreds of communities in Australia’s neighbourhood to share their knowledge and experience in tackling a changing climate. With relatively small populations, the women and men of islands like Nissan have done little to contribute to climate change, but the reality of their circumstance means they’re on the front line of dealing with its impact.

Learn more about CARE’s work to support communities affected by climate change

Addressing health and nutrition in South Sudan

2014 May 28

Since the beginning of the crisis, almost 1.4 million South Sudanese have been displaced, of whom about 360,000 people have fled to Ethiopia, Kenya, Sudan and Uganda. Up to 87,000 people are sheltering in U.N. Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) compounds in the country. Due to insecurity and displacement, many people are unable to farm, access their normal food sources or migrate with their livestock. More than 20 per cent of the population was undernourished before the current crisis and deadly epidemic outbreaks are frequent and spread easily.

CARE supported health facilities continue to operate in both Jonglei and Unity states, treating hundreds of people wounded in the conflict on top of the usual case load dominated by malaria, gastrointestinal illnesses, respiratory infections and sexual and reproductive health services. CARE is providing Water, Sanitation, Hygiene (WASH) and nutrition services to Internally Displaced Persons (IDP) in Bentiu’s Protection of Civilian (PoC) and WASH and protection services to displaced people in Malakal’s PoC.

At the end of March, CARE completed a WASH project in the Eastern Equatoria town of Nimule, on the border with Uganda. Through this project, CARE assisted over 9,000 people with Gender Based Violence (GBV) prevention activities among displaced communities. CARE food security and livelihoods projects are getting off the ground in Jonglei’s Twic East, Duk and Uror counties.

CARE’s crisis response in Unity State has so far reached a total of 16,064 people directly, including 13,392 with health services, 1,900 with WASH and 2,445 with nutrition in two PoCs.

Donate to CARE’s South Sudan Appeal or learn more about our work in South Sudan

South Sudan CARE Soap distribution

People gather at a CARE soap distribution in Nimule, South Sudan, a town on the border with Uganda that is hosting tens of thousands of people displaced by violence in other parts of the country. March 28,2014. Photo by Dan Alder/CARE

South Sudan CARE Soap distribution

CARE Emerency Coordinator Isaac Vuciri talks to people gathered for a soap distribution in Nimule, South Sudan, a town on the border with Uganda that is hosting tens of thousands of people displaced by violence in other parts of the country. March 28,2014. Photo by Dan Alder/CARE

South Sudan CARE health services

People line up to register for food distribution, nutrition and health screening, vaccinations and protection services at the multi-agency rapid response mission to Pagak, Upper Nile in South Sudan led by WFP and UNICEF and supported by CARE and other INGOs. by Dan Alder. April 12, 2014

South Sudan CARE sanitation

CARE staff discuss sanitation issues with a community water management committee during a soap distribution in Nimule, South Sudan, a town on the border with Uganda that is hosting tens of thousands of people displaced by violence in other parts of the country. March 28,2014. Photo by Dan Alder/CARE

South Sudan CARE sanitation

CARE staff share a laugh with a group of women attending a sanitation workshop in Nimule, South Sudan, a town on the border with Uganda that is hosting tens of thousands of people displaced by violence in other parts of the country. Clean water and proper waste disposal can make a big difference in the lives of the displaced in places with no public services. March 28,2014. Photo by Dan Alder/CARE

Donate to CARE’s South Sudan Appeal or learn more about our work in South Sudan

Magazine helping tackle illiteracy in Timor-Leste

2014 May 27

In Timor-Leste, CARE is producing educational magazines and radio broadcasts to help communities with literacy, numeracy and life skills.

Lafaek is the only educational publication in Timor-Leste in the local language, Tetun, and covers topics like geography, language, health, culture and science, and issues such as peace, international affairs and women’s rights.

CARE has been producing and distributing Lafaek magazines in Timor-Leste since 2000, starting the publication as a Child Rights magazine after the 1999 Referendum for Independence.

School children in Timor-Leste read their copies of CARE's educational magazine 'Lafaek', which is the only publication in the country that uses the national language Tetun

School children in Timor-Leste read their copies of CARE’s educational magazine ‘Lafaek’, which is the only publication in the country that uses the national language Tetun. ©Jane Dempster/CARE

Five times a year between 2004 and 2009, CARE distributed 327,000 copies, reaching over 280,000 students nationwide.

Throughout Timor-Leste, every class and teacher in grades one to nine received issues of Lafaek from 2005 to 2009 thanks to an exceptional distribution network including field officers on motorbike and horseback reaching the remotest of regions.

Response to Lafaek has been tremendous:

  • 96% of teachers attested to the importance and popularity of the Lafaek magazines and reported using them to teach, emphasising that they were the only locally created, locally relevant, consistent curriculum support – and the only educational materials ‘that work’
  • 99% of teachers stated that Lafaek supported children’s learning in basic literacy, languages, natural and social sciences, health, geography, history and civic education
  • 86% of teachers used Lafaek for lesson plans, curriculum content, ideas for activities and their own professional development
  • 91% of children in grades five to nine said they were learning from Lafaek
  • 79% of children said they also used the magazines at home
  • Parents were equally enthusiastic, saying that the magazine helped them to increase their knowledge and to have a better grasp of what their children were learning
Children from Liquica reading the Lafaek Community Magazine during one of CARE’s Health Program Mother’s Group meetings

Children from Liquica reading the Lafaek Community Magazine during one of CARE’s Health Program Mother’s Group meetings. ©Sarah Rippin/CARE

The magazine has taken different forms over the years and the Lafaek team are currently distributing Lafaek ba Komunidade (Lafaek Community Magazine) which teaches and informs communities, adults with low literacy skills and children through colourful, innovative and informative articles.

Lafaek’s printed materials and community radio broadcasts target literacy and numeracy, civic education, agriculture, small business management, health and hygiene.

Learn more about CARE’s work in Timor-Leste

Self-help and community acceptance in Myanmar

2014 May 27

When Daw Than Lwin and her husband were diagnosed with HIV in 2000, the discrimination she faced from her family and friends was as heart-breaking as her diagnosis.

Her family distanced themselves from her due to the stigma of the illness, and she nursed her husband on her own until he died in 2003.

‘In rural areas [of Myanmar], people with HIV just give up on life. There is a lack of awareness and services. Even if they know their status they just go back to their village and die,’ she explains.

But that was 14 years ago, and Daw Than Lwin says that today, there is no longer such a strong fear of infection.

'In rural areas [of Myanmar], people with HIV just give up on life,' says Daw Than Lwin

‘In rural areas [of Myanmar], people with HIV just give up on life,’ says Daw Than Lwin. ©Tom Greenwood/CARE

‘Before, there was a lot of discrimination but since then a lot has changed. Now people in the community look after people with HIV.’

She has helped to create this change, as a leader of a CARE-supported self-help group for people who are HIV positive.

‘Since taking Anti-Retro Virus medication, my health has improved,’ she says. ‘I like volunteer work because I’m helping people in the same situation as me.’

Daw Than Lwin’s group consists of 13 women and one man. They sew bags, school uniforms and other clothes to sell and the profits are used to support their children’s school fees and healthcare costs. They also support each other and refer patients from outside the group to services.

‘I’m very happy to help people in a similar situation to myself. I can provide for the needs of the members and their children. It’s very satisfying.’

CARE supports the groups with counselling, nutrition and medical support, and training in new skills and support networks to earn an income.

Daw Than Lwin is now leader of a CARE-supported self-help group for people who are HIV positive.

Daw Than Lwin is now leader of a CARE-supported self-help group for people who are HIV positive. ©Tom Greenwood/CARE

‘If I hadn’t received CARE support I would be poor and depressed. There would be no self-help group,’ she says.

Daw Than Lwin’s family’s attitude has also changed since she has become a group leader.

‘I get more respect from the community. People depend on me. I am encouraged to do more volunteer work.’

Daw Than Lwin’s group does a lot for their community, including supporting and contributing to treatment costs for people with HIV, running a nutrition program for children, providing school supplies and organising sewing training.

‘We want to support other group members who are not able to work, and who are lying in bed, as much as possible. Our aim is for people living with HIV to be healthy and happy.’

Learn more about CARE’s work in Myanmar

Australia’s commitment to women’s economic empowerment a positive step

2014 May 23

CARE Australia has welcomed the Government’s commitment to women and girls’ empowerment in the Australian aid program, following the announcement of a new initiative to strengthen women’s trade opportunities in Asia-Pacific.

Australia’s Ambassador for Women and Girls, Natasha Stott Despoja, today announced the initiative – which will strengthen trade promotion of women exporters across the region – during the APEC Women and the Economy Forum in Beijing.

‘Access to economic opportunities increases a woman’s sense of pride, purpose and decision-making power. Initiatives such as this are to be commended, as they recognise the critical role women’s empowerment plays in the region’s economic development,’ said Jenny Clement, CARE Australia’s Country Programs Manager.

The Australian Government has announced a new initiative to strengthen women's trade opportunities in Asia-Pacific

The Australian Government has announced a new initiative to strengthen women’s trade opportunities in Asia-Pacific. ©Josh Estey/CARE

‘By investing in programs that provide economic opportunities for women, not only will the region’s women be better able to meet their own needs but the entire region will benefit with increased productivity and fewer families living in poverty.’

In APEC countries including Papua New Guinea, CARE works with coffee companies and growers to increase productivity and strengthen family business management practices so that men and women from coffee farming families can work together to grow their income.

Ms Clement said the benefits of creating economic opportunities such as these for some of the world’s poorest women were immense.

‘When a woman does not have the same level of participation as her partner, not only does she miss out; so does her country. The Asia-Pacific region – our region – loses between $42 and $47 billion each year because of restrictions on women’s employment.

‘If women had the same access to farming supplies as men, for example, the agricultural output in 34 of the world’s poorest countries would increase significantly, leading to an estimated 150 million fewer people going hungry each day.’

Ms Clement added that while the statement from Ambassador Stott Despoja was recognition of the value of investing in women’s economic development, it was being made on the back of a $7.6 billion cut – almost 10 per cent – to Australia’s aid program over the coming five years.

‘While we welcome this demonstration of the Government’s commitment to women and girls, the reality of cuts to foreign aid means that fewer families living in extreme poverty will be able to see the benefit of initiatives such as this.’

Learn more about CARE’s work with women and girls

‘Humanitarian catastrophe’ in South Sudan

2014 May 22

Donate to CARE’s South Sudan Appeal

by Robert Glasser, CARE International Secretary General

Three years ago, the world witnessed the birth of a new nation, as the people of South Sudan united in eager, hopeful anticipation. People sang independence songs, and a huge clock in the centre of Juba, the capital, counted down the days. Today, the picture is quite different. The head of our South Sudan office describes a nightmarish, “soul-destroying” situation: never in her 20-year career has she had to sit by and watch people near starvation – with not enough funding to do anything about it.

Since conflict broke out in December between the government and opposition, we have seen a wave of violent attacks, rapes and fighting that have plunged the fledgling country into chaos and led its people to the brink of a catastrophic food crisis.

Again, the world is watching – but we aren’t doing enough to stop what is already a humanitarian catastrophe, which will become much worse unless immediate action is taken. There are two clear steps that need to be taken immediately: an end to the violence and a lasting political solution to the crisis; and up-front funding commitments from the international community to meet the immense humanitarian needs in South Sudan. AUD $1.35 billion is needed now to prevent the worst, but barely more than a third of that has been raised. If the total funding isn’t provided now, the ultimate cost of the emergency response will only grow. We know from experience that prevention costs much less than a full-blown emergency response.

Hundreds of people crowd a space just inside the gate of the UN mission in Bentiu amid rumours of an imminent attack on the town. The displaced persons are waiting to be registered so that they can proceed to the relative protection of an ad hoc settlement further inside the base.

Hundreds of people crowd a space just inside the gate of the UN mission in Bentiu amid rumours of an imminent attack on the town. The displaced persons are waiting to be registered so that they can proceed to the relative protection of an ad hoc settlement further inside the base. ©Dan Alder/CARE

The human cost of inaction is stark. More than 1 million people have fled their homes within South Sudan, finding shelter in the bush or in the perceived safety of United Nations compounds across the country. More than 300,000 others have become refugees in neighbouring countries. Thousands have been killed, and the UN has recently said there are reasonable grounds to believe that crimes against humanity have been committed.

Heavy fighting and the onset of the rainy season have cut off the few existing roads, leaving tens of thousands without any assistance at all. Planes full of aid and humanitarian workers cannot land because airstrips are under water or blocked by fighting. Worse, the armed conflict raging across half the country prevented farmers from planting seeds in time for the planting season, and now not enough crops will grow to feed the country in the coming year, leading to warnings from the UN of a potential famine in several states.

If the world does not act, if the conflict does not end, more people will die – from violence, or from hunger. And an insidious, lesser-known evil will grow: sexual violence and exploitation. Research being released by CARE to coincide with the Oslo conference shows that the escalation in the conflict has been accompanied by a rise in sexual violence, largely against women and girls, and our experience tells us this situation will worsen if the conflict continues.

In between spates of violent conflict CARE ventures into Bentiu town to run a mobile clinic. In its first two days after the most recent round of fighting, the clinic served more than 100 people, including Nyakuik Tap and her twelve month old daughter.

In between spates of violent conflict CARE ventures into Bentiu town to run a mobile clinic. In its first two days after the most recent round of fighting, the clinic served more than 100 people, including Nyakuik Tap and her twelve month old daughter. ©Dan Alder/CARE

CARE staff in South Sudan are receiving reports of women and girls being raped and killed in the bush or in hospitals and churches where they have sought shelter. Women are selling themselves for sex in exchange for access to drinking water for themselves and their families. Parents are offering their young daughters as child brides in return for a dowry or to ease the burden of feeding an extra person. I was sickened to hear that one woman interviewed referred to another woman who had been raped as ‘lucky’, because it could have been worse – other women were raped and then killed.

In the face of the overwhelming need in South Sudan, the issue of sexual violence might seem peripheral – but sexual violence is a symptom of a broader societal breakdown. If the violence does not stop, the repercussions of unpunished rapes and assaults will haunt the South Sudanese for years. We have seen this in other conflicts around the world.

CARE is supporting more than 40 health clinics across the country, including in the areas worst affected by the fighting, providing first aid, food and water alongside maternal health services. But it is a fraction of what is needed.  We are watching as families eat leaves from the trees in a desperate effort to survive. This is simply unacceptable.

As the world’s attention is stretched by other crises and world events, the Oslo conference is a tangible opportunity to help South Sudan. If we act now, we can prevent the worst, and help the people of South Sudan return to a more hopeful path.

Donate to CARE’s South Sudan Appeal or learn more about our work in South Sudan

- Dr Robert Glasser was Chief Executive of CARE Australia from 2003 to 2007. He is currently Secretary General of CARE International.

The Federal Budget: What it means for the world’s poor

2014 May 14

by Robert Yallop, Principal Executive – International Operations, CARE Australia

In the lead up to last night’s budget, the overwhelming message was of a ‘tough budget’; that Australia’s balance sheet is in dire straits.

The reality is that if the Government does have a budget problem, it is not due to spending on foreign aid. Aid represents just over one per cent of the Australian Government’s spending. In effect, just 34 cents for every $100 of Australian income is spent on supporting our neighbours, far less than similarly-sized economies such as the UK (72 cents for every $100), Netherlands (67 cents) and Denmark (85 cents).

The Government has broken a clear pre- and post-election promise to keep aid funding in line with the Consumer Price Index. However what makes last night’s announcement of a $7.6 billion, five-year cut to Australia’s aid program so disappointing is that unlike many other areas, foreign aid has been subject to a series of consistent and heavy cuts since 2012.

The Australian Government has announced a $7.9 billion, five-year cut to Australia’s aid program.

The Australian Government has announced a $7.6 billion, five-year cut to Australia’s aid program. ©Josh Estey/CARE

Based on the details that were released last night, this is a 9.7 per cent cut to Australia’s aid efforts over the coming five years, while the Government’s spending is projected to increase by 9.3 per cent over the same period. In short, while many sectors are now reeling from the cuts that were announced last night, foreign aid has already been taking many hits. While not a knock-out, this is a particularly heavy blow.

The impact will be felt on the ground in some of Australia’s poorest neighbours like Cambodia and Timor-Leste, as our work faces the reality of shrinking funding.

Yet some people are asking why we should worry about foreign aid at a time when many Australians are struggling. It is a fair question. The answer is that we can do both. Australia remains one of the wealthiest countries in the world. We can support those doing it tough at home while still helping many of the poorest people in Asia-Pacific. We do not have to choose between the two.

The impact of aid cuts will be felt on the ground in some of Australia’s poorest neighbours like Cambodia and Timor-Leste

The impact of aid cuts will be felt on the ground in some of Australia’s poorest neighbours like Cambodia and Timor-Leste. ©Tom Greenwood/CARE

Foreign Minister Julie Bishop has spoken of aid as an ‘investment’, and one in which ‘we must see a return.(1)’ At CARE Australia, we could not agree more. The return that comes from investing in aid drives our work to tackle poverty and injustice.

CARE’s evidence shows that if you support one woman out of poverty, she will bring four others with her. Those five people, lifted out of poverty, will be able to earn an income, raise healthier families and contribute to the growth of their country’s economy.

The knock-on effects for Australia are significant. As the number of people living in poverty in our region reduces, the region becomes more prosperous and more secure, with lasting economic opportunities such as trade and investment. That’s a five-for-one investment with an outstanding return for Australia.

On pure numbers, five-for-one would make any investor happy. That’s what makes last night’s $7.6 billion cut so disappointing.

You can support CARE’s work – donate to our Foreign Aid Cut Appeal

(1) http://foreignminister.gov.au/speeches/Pages/2014/jb_mr_140429.aspx

Timor-Leste: Juvita’s healthy boys

2014 May 13

By Amelia Taylor, CARE Australia 

As a mother of two boys in Timor-Leste, Juvita is naturally proud of her children’s achievements, but none more so than the progress they are making on their CARE growth chart.

Every month, Juvita attends a CARE-supported government health post in Balibo, Timor-Leste, with her husband and two boys, three-year-old Antonio* and seven-month-old Julio*. Here, the boys are measured, weighed and their growth is plotted against their records for the past three years.

Today, Antonio* tips the scales at 13 kilograms, while little Julio* is a healthy eight kilograms. In a country with high infant and child mortality, and where half the children under five suffer from chronic malnutrition, Juvita is thrilled with their results.

Juvita places seven-month-old Julio into a sling to be weighed. Her children are regularly weighed and measured to check for signs of malnutrition.

Juvita places seven-month-old Julio into a sling to be weighed at a CARE-supported health post. Her children are regularly weighed and measured to check for signs of malnutrition. ©Josh Estey/CARE

Should the boys fall from the green and into the yellow warning part of their growth chart, CARE refers children to government health workers who provide supplementary feeding. The boys also receive immunisations at the centre, and basic health checks.

‘I feel better now,’ explains Juvita, ‘because I can get some information on health and bring my children to get treatment, get a check up and get medication if they need it. The children are healthier than before.’

Juvita herself also benefits from the centre. As a pregnant and then breastfeeding woman, she has her weight monitored with similar supplementary feeding available if required.

If children show signs of malnutrition, they recieve supplementary feeding to help them recover quickly.

If children show signs of malnutrition, they recieve supplementary feeding to help them recover quickly. ©Josh Estey/CARE

She has also learnt information vital to her young family’s health from the CARE-trained community health volunteers at the centre. These community members speak to the group of around 100 people at the monthly sessions about different health risks and how to reduce them – including malaria, malnutrition and anemia.

‘I have learnt to use a mosquito net, drink clean boiled water and to wash our hands. These things have made my family healthier,’ Juvita says.

She appreciates learning the information from a familiar local community member who is aware of local traditions and concerns.

‘The health volunteers provide education and a lot of information about health to the community. They are well trained giving these messages. I like the advice being provided by them.’

The benefits for this family are evident, not only from the boys’ growth charts but also from the proud smile on Juvita’s face as she looks at her youngest son sleeping peacefully in her arms.

*CARE is committed to being a child safe organisation. Names of children have been changed. 

Learn more about CARE’s work in Timor-Leste

Celebrating mothers around the world

2014 May 6

Happy Mother’s Day to all the mothers around the world!

This Mother’s Day, we celebrate the millions of amazing mothers CARE is supporting, who are helping their families and communities overcome poverty.

Palmira Sanches won an award for being a role model parent in one of CARE's education projects in Timor-Leste. Palmira encourages her daughter Fidelia* to go to school, even tough many girls in Timor-Leste miss out on an education in order the help their families work or look after the house. Image: Josh Estey/CARE.

Palmira Sanches won an award for being a role model parent in one of CARE’s education projects in Timor-Leste. Palmira encourages her daughter Fidelia* (name changed) to go to school, even though many girls in Timor-Leste miss out on an education in order the help their families work or look after the household. ©Josh Estey/CARE.

Evelyn, 24-yearls-old, is a member of a Motherhood Skills Groups CARE supports in Papua New Guinea. The groups learns how to improve their family's health and new skills, such as sewing,  to earn an income. Image: Josh Estey/CARE

Evelyn, 24-yearls-old, is a member of a Motherhood Skills Group CARE supports in Papua New Guinea. The group learns how to improve their family’s health and develops new skills, such as sewing, to earn an income. ©Josh Estey/CARE

CARE supported pregnant women and mothers after Typhoon Haiyan devastated the Philippines in November 2013. Image: Peter Caton/CARE.

CARE supported pregnant women and mothers after Typhoon Haiyan devastated the Philippines in November 2013. ©Peter Caton/CARE.

Fortunate is a member of CARE's Village Savings and Loans group in Malawi. She is learning to save and invest her money to earn a greater income. Image: Josh Estey/CARE.

Fortunate is a member of CARE’s Village Savings and Loans group in Malawi. She is learning to save and invest her money to earn a greater income. ©Josh Estey/CARE.

A mother arrives at Dagahaley refugee camp in Kenya with her baby. After registering, CARE provides refugees with items like tarpaulins, kitchen sets, soap, blankets and an initial food supply. Image: Evelyn Hockstein/CARE

A mother arrives at Dagahaley refugee camp in Kenya with her baby. After registering, CARE provides refugees with items like tarpaulins, kitchen sets, soap, blankets and an initial food supply. ©Evelyn Hockstein/CARE

Makeda* (name  changed), 16, is part of CARE’s Toward Improved Economic and Sexual Reproductive Health Outcomes for Adolescent Girls project in Ethiopia, which improves the sexual reproductive health of adolescent girls and educates the community about the dangers of child marriage.

Makeda* (name changed), 16, is part of CARE’s Toward Improved Economic and Sexual Reproductive Health Outcomes for Adolescent Girls project in Ethiopia, which improves the sexual reproductive health of adolescent girls and educates the community about the dangers of child marriage. ©Josh Estey/CARE

Support CARE’s work with women and girls around the world.

Hungry for peace: Conflict in South Sudan taking toll on most vulnerable

2014 May 5

Donate to CARE’s South Sudan Appeal

Nyakuic brings her baby to CARE’s mobile clinic, set up under a tree in the dirt yard of Bentiu’s Catholic church. Twelve-month old Kuang* alternately tries to breast feed and cries. She is suffering from severe acute malnutrition.

‘I don’t have enough food for myself,’ Nyakuic says.

‘I can’t produce enough milk for the baby. We used to have cows for milk, but because of the fighting they took the cows off to someplace where they would be safe.’

Not so the women and children.

Nyakuik and her twelve-month old daughter Kuang, who is suffering from acute malnutrition, visit CARE's mobile health clinic.

Nyakuik and her twelve-month old daughter Kuang, who is suffering from acute malnutrition, visit CARE’s mobile health clinic. ©Dan Alder/CARE

‘Woman have assumed most of the burden for caring for families at a time when many of them are essentially homeless, they are at risk of violence and the food situation in South Sudan is getting to a critical level,’ says CARE Country Director Aimee Ansari.

‘In some places where we are going to distribute seed and farm tools so people can plant food crops, we have to figure out how to feed people first because they are too weak to work the land.’

CARE staff give Nyakuic packets of rehydration therapy powder and a referral to CARE’s nutrition clinic for malnourished children in a UN base in Bentiu. The therapy provided there is basic but effective at reversing an otherwise debilitating and often fatal condition.

CARE health workers see patients at a mobile clinic in Bentiu, South Sudan.

CARE health workers see patients at a mobile clinic in Bentiu, South Sudan. ©Dan Alder/CARE

Later that night and all the next morning, the neighbouring towns of Bentiu and Rubkona are in a panic over rumours of an impending attack. There is a steady stream of people walking down the dirt road with whatever possessions they can carry toward the UN base in Benitu, which has set up a protection of civilians area (PoC) filled with makeshift shelters covered with white tarps provided by the humanitarian community.

The people of Bentiu have been moving in and out of this PoC area for months now, as the town changed hands several times between government and opposition forces. Each time, human rights abuses are experienced by those civilians unfortunate enough to be caught in the town.

CARE is supporting displaced people, providing nursing and clinical personnel, sanitation facilities and a communal kitchen. The last occupation of Bentiu occurred in mid-April, boosting the PoC population from around 8,000 to over 22,000. Hundreds more are streaming into the compound as a result of the latest threat, and CARE is working to build additional toilets and deploying health workers.

More than 22,000 South Sudanese have taken shelter in a UN base in Bentiu to escape ongoing violence.

More than 22,000 South Sudanese have taken shelter in a UN base in Bentiu to escape ongoing violence. ©Dan Alder/CARE

CARE is also hard at work reaching out to the hundreds of thousands of people displaced and in desperate need throughout the northern region of South Sudan, where a brutal conflict has raged for more than four months. At least 1.3 million people, more than 10 percent of the population, have been displaced from their homes and livelihoods.

CARE has been in the most affected areas of the country for more than 15 years, providing health care and helping people restore their life by providing seed and farming tools, repairing water wells and helping with sanitation facilities.

The situation in Bentiu has been so unpredictable and dangerous that CARE’s activities have been largely confined to the UN base and its PoC. CARE medical staff venture out of the UN compound when it is safe enough to go into town and for townspeople to venture out for medical treatment.

The mobile clinic consists of a handful of clinical and support staff, basic diagnostic tools, boxes of medicines and plastic tables and chairs which can be hastily assembled under a tree, or quickly packed into the back of a utility vehicle and hauled back to the UN base.

With rumours of approaching troops, townspeople have to make a choice: run for the bush and the relative safety of remote villages or head for the PoC. Because she had not been living on the UN compound, staff wonder which direction Nyakuic will run. If she heads back into the bush chances are, without proper therapy, her little girl will not long survive.

Donate to CARE’s South Sudan Appeal or read more about CARE’s work in South Sudan

*CARE is committed be being a child safe organisation. Names of children have been changed.

Vietnam: Garment workers find their voice

2014 May 5

by Roslyn Boatman, CARE Australia

In a sprawling garment factory in an industrial estate outside of Hanoi, Luyen, Van and Nhien take a break from their busy work at a GAP clothing factory.  These young women are bright and confident – a new generation of women who are not only working, but also standing up for their rights, and for themselves.

All three are part of CARE’s PACE project (Personal Advancement and Career Enhancement, in partnership with GAP Inc.), which works with employees in factories throughout Vietnam to improve their confidence, self esteem and health education. Already, CARE has seen that the women taking part in the project have improved awareness of basic life skills such as decision-making, problem-solving and health knowledge, which in the long-term will lead to better career advancement and allow them to stand up for their rights in their professional and personal life.

Luyen, Van and Nhien work in a clothing factory in Vietnam, where CARE's PACE project works with factory employees to improve their confidence, self esteem and health education.

Luyen, Van and Nhien work in a clothing factory in Vietnam, where CARE’s PACE project works with factory employees to improve their confidence, self esteem and health education. ©Josh Estey/CARE

While the project is only in its early stages, Luyen, the youngest of the group, says she has already benefited from what she has learnt.

‘I can apply many things into my life, and I have more confidence in my work and with my friends,’ she says. ‘I am more confident because I have learnt communications skills and I have gained more experience and I know more about problem solving.’

Health awareness is also an integral part of the project; equipping young women with knowledge they previously had very little access to.

Since taking part in CARE training, Luyen says she has more confidence in her work and with her friends.

Since taking part in CARE training, Luyen says she has more confidence in her work and with her friends. ©Josh Estey/CARE

‘Before, we only knew about health through the newspaper and the internet, but through this project we have gained knowledge about life skills and reproductive health. This information is very important to me,’ Luyen says.

Van, a mother of three who has been working in the factory for three years, agrees that the knowledge and skills she has learnt have played a hugely positive role in not only her work, but in every facet of her life.

‘I learnt a lot through the project.  I can apply the skills in my life and I can also teach them to my children. Previously, I was very scared.  I never had contact with my manager, but now I am more confident and I can speak to them. My salary used to be very low, and then I told my boss that I have been working here for more than two years and my salary is still low and I got a higher allowance. My family was in a hard position but now my income is very stable.’

Learn more about CARE’s work in Vietnam

Vietnam: Chickens bring opportunity for villagers in remote Vietnam

2014 May 2

by Roslyn Boatman, CARE Australia

Trieu, part of a vulnerable ethnic minority in her village, received training from CARE in bio-safe chicken feeding in 2009. After convincing others to join in the project,  they formed a group who received a small loan and invested the money in equipment and 50 small chicks. Today, from such humble beginnings, the group is the key provider of young chicks to the entire region and can now earn a steady income.

A tiny room at the front of a home in northern Vietnam has been transformed into a classroom, and Trieu, a small woman with abundant energy and enthusiasm, is the teacher. A crowd of people sit on the floor in front of her eagerly participating in her training session.  For many, she is the only teacher they have ever known and the information she is sharing with them has the potential to change their lives, just like it changed hers.

Today, the topic is how to raise chickens. These skills will allow the participants to be more effective in their animal-raising, improve their livelihoods and give them the ability to build a better future for their families.  It may sound simple enough, but the effects these skills can have on their day-to-day lives is significant.

Trieu, part of a vulnerable ethnic minority in her village, received training from CARE in bio-safe chicken feeding and convinced other members in her village to be part of the project.

Trieu, part of a vulnerable ethnic minority in her village, received training from CARE in bio-safe chicken feeding and convinced other members in her village to be part of the project. ©Josh Estey/CARE

In 2009, Trieu, part of a vulnerable ethnic minority in her village, had her first training from CARE in bio-safe chicken feeding and convinced other members in her village to be part of the project’s first pilot group. The group received a small loan, invested the money in the necessary equipment and 50 small chicks. They received invaluable knowledge and skills about how to make the most of this opportunity.

‘Previously, we were poor farmers and it was hard for us to get a job and earn money. We had the materials but we didn’t know the techniques to be productive. When the project came into the village, we saw it was very useful and we were provided with information on how to raise chickens,’ she says.

Today, from such humble beginnings, this group is the key provider of young chicks to the entire region and can now earn a steady income.

‘I am very happy when I see the impact because now we can become rich on our own land. We don’t have to go outside our village to earn money.  Previously, many women had to go to a foreign country to earn money but now they can stay and work at home and look after their children at the same time, so I am very happy.

Trieu's group is now the key provider of young chicks to the entire region and can earn a steady income.

Trieu’s group is now the key provider of young chicks to the entire region and can earn a steady income. ©Josh Estey/CARE

‘With the project, after three months I raised 50 chickens and my income increased. CARE came here with the project and now I can support my children to go to school – in fact two of them are now studying at university.’

Trieu was selected to become a community leader and now leads her community through example.

‘A very important change here is the thinking of people towards women. Take me as an example. I passed the university entrance exam but I couldn’t go because my family didn’t allow me, I had to stay in the village. But now there are big changes in other people’s perceptions and now I can do many more things if I want.

‘Other women in the community have more confidence too. Before, they could not come to this kind of training, but now their husbands support them.

‘I think we can improve the thinking of the community – the thinking and the way of doing things can be changed. I think we should dare to think and dare to do.’

Learn more about CARE’s work in Vietnam

Fighting poverty around the world

2014 May 1
by careaustralia

CARE has nearly 70 years of experience helping the poorest communities in the world overcome poverty, but what does that look like?

Here are just a few examples of CARE’s long-term working fighting poverty around the world today:

Afghanistan is one of the poorest countries in the world. Education can be out of reach for many - particularly girls and those living in remote areas. CARE has been supporting education in Afghanistan for nearly 20 years, providing children like this 9-year-old student with good quality education. Image: CARE.

Afghanistan is one of the poorest countries in the world. Education can be out of reach for many – particularly girls and those living in remote areas. CARE has been supporting education in Afghanistan for nearly 20 years, providing children like this 9-year-old student with the chance to go to school. Image: CARE.

 

Benvinda (centre) is the leader of  a farmer's group CARE is supporting in Timor-Leste. The farmers work together and with the training, improved seed varieties, tools and materials provided by CARE they are able to increase crop yield, earn an income and build their resilience to cope during times of food shortage. Image: Tom Greenwood/CARE.

Benvinda (centre) is the leader of a farmer’s group CARE is supporting in Timor-Leste. The farmers work together and receive training, improved seed varieties, tools and materials from CARE to increase crop yield, earn an income and build their resilience to cope during times of food shortage. Image: Tom Greenwood/CARE.

 

Ninety-five per cent of CARE’s staff are nationals of the country they work in – which means they understand the local language, culture, and issues facing the community. Bopha Lam is 30 years old and has worked with CARE in Cambodia for two years as a Teacher Trainer. Image: Laura Hill/CARE.

 

Ma Thi Huong is 35 and a local farmer trainer on pig and sow raising.  Through her involvement in the project she participated in training activities and provided with her new techniques which have seen her piglets gain weight faster, contract few diseases and therefore increase her income. With the extra income she has been able to build a new home for her family. Image: Josh Estey/CARE

Ma Thi Huong is 35 and lives in Vietnam. She is a pig farmer who participated in training run by CARE on new techniques to care for her animals. She has increased her income, which has allowed her to build a new home for her family. Image: Josh Estey/CARE

2011_ZIM_WASH_JE_Health club group meeting 6

Lobina is a member of the Mothers' Group in Malita's village, who volunteer their time to help keep children in school.

Lobina is a member of a Mothers’ Group supported by CARE in Malawi. The group members volunteer their time as advocates for education and encourage parents to keep their children in school. ©Josh Estey/CARE

Remedios Petilla, 70, stands proudly in her home which was re-built using a shelter repair kit provided by CARE and our partner ACCORD following Typhoon Haiyan in the Philipines.  Image: CARE.

Remedios Petilla, 70, stands proudly in her home which was re-built using a shelter repair kit provided by CARE and our partner ACCORD following Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines. Image: CARE.

 

School children in Timor-Leste read their copies of CARE's educational magazine 'Lafaek', which is the only publication in the country that uses the national language Tetun. Image: Jane Dempster/CARE.

School children in Timor-Leste read their copies of CARE’s educational magazine ‘Lafaek’, which is the only publication in the country that uses the national language Tetun. Image: Jane Dempster/CARE.

Visit CARE Australia’s website for more information.

 

 

 

 

Reducing risks for women in urban Laos

2014 April 28

As an increasing number of women and girls migrate from rural areas of Laos to the capital Vientiane in search of new work opportunities, many find themselves without a support network and at risk of experiencing violence, unequal pay and poor living conditions.

CARE is supporting vulnerable women and girls in the capital Vientiane – particularly those working in the garment, hospitality and sex industries – by establishing women’s groups and networks to help them understand their rights and learn how to resist pressure from fellow workers and male clients. Duty bearers – such as police, health service providers and employers – are also trained on gender-based violence and legal and labour protection to reduce discrimination.

Women who move from rural to urban areas can become vulnerable to exploitation in many industries, such as hospitality. Jeff Williams/CARE

Women who move from rural to urban areas can become vulnerable to exploitation in many industries, such as hospitality. ©Jeff Williams/CARE

 

Two Legal Literacy Officers, trained by CARE, talk to hospitality workers about their rights. Jeff Williams/CARE.

Two Legal Literacy Officers, trained by CARE, talk to hospitality workers about their rights. ©Jeff Williams/CARE.

25-year-old Tan* moved to Vientiane in 2007 and found work as a cashier in a bar. She joined the project when a CARE team came to speak with staff at her workplace.

‘I didn’t know much about the industry. My boss was angry a lot of the time and I didn’t know how to deal with it. I would just sit there with no reaction.

‘Since working in this project I now know about my legal rights and who to go and talk to if there’s a problem. I can now stand up for myself and say what is right and what is wrong.

‘The employers try to find out what your previous experiences are and what you know about the law – so it’s really important for me to know all of these things; if you don’t know much they can trick you.’

With renewed confidence, Tan left her job in the bar and now works in marketing. With her increased salary, she is able to support her family in her home village.

Oneof the radio program hosts runs a talkback radio program on gender and health issues. Jeff Williams/CARE

A radio program shares information and takes caller questions on gender and health issues. ©Jeff Williams/CARE

She now supports the project by attending training sessions led by CARE and sharing information and advice with her peers about issues including human trafficking, gender-based violence and women’s rights.

‘The biggest challenge I have come across is when boyfriends go out and get drunk and then come home and fight with their girlfriends, but the women don’t know how to react or defend themselves. I tell [the women] who to speak to, to go to the doctor, to take photos of any injuries and to go to the police. Do not sit inside and cry all day and all night.

‘I transfer them to the experts if I don’t know the answer; there is a clinic that these women can call or go to and get help. I like to share information with others, and I’m proud of myself for doing so,’ she says.

Find out more about CARE’s work in Laos.

*Names changed

South Sudan: CARE staff swing into action

2014 April 23

By Dan Alder

CARE’s daily routine in Bentiu, South Sudan was interrupted by fighting this week, but project coordinator Rose Ejuru found plenty to do. She immediately changed roles, reverting to her medical training as a nurse to help tend several hundred patients who flowed into the clinic located inside the town’s UN compound.

‘We must have received 200 wounded. They filled the clinic and then we started putting them in the conference room. There are patients everywhere,’ Ms. Ejuru said. ‘So far we have not lost anybody.’

‘During the fighting it was really intense, but we put on protective gear and we kept on working,’ she added. Her patients have included a three-year-old who was wounded and a 10-year-old boy who was shot twice, with one of the bullets shattering a bone in his leg. The fighting started on Sunday and lasted for several days, ending with the Unity State capital once again changing hands. South Sudan erupted in political violence in mid-December 2013 and more than one million people have had to flee their homes. A quarter of a million people have abandoned the world’s newest country altogether, fleeing to neighbouring nations.

CARE has been providing nutritional support and basic health care in Bentiu since before the current crisis began and is currently supporting operations inside the UN Mission Protection of Civilians area and in mobile clinics that have operated in Bentiu town.

CARE Emerency Coordinator Isaac Vuciri talks to people gathered for a soap distribution in Nimule, South Sudan, a town on the border with Uganda that is hosting tens of thousands of people displaced by violence in other parts of the country. March 28,2014. Photo by Dan Alder/CARE

CARE Emergency Coordinator Isaac Vuciri talks to people gathered for a soap distribution in Nimule, South Sudan, a town on the border with Uganda that is hosting tens of thousands of people displaced by violence in other parts of the country. Photo: Dan Alder/CARE

Nationwide, CARE has provided tens of thousands of people affected by the conflict with water and sanitation services, medical care and nutrition and protection services. We have especially targeted women and girls, who have borne the brunt of the crisis while scrambling to keep their children out of harm’s way. Now with the rainy season getting started and many markets and livelihoods disrupted, aid agencies are hurrying to pre-position supplies in the face of a looming food crisis.

Four days after the most recent fighting in Bentiu, Ms. Ejuru was able to get a few hours of sleep and said she felt refreshed after being able to take a shower. ‘We have been doing triage, attending to the worst injured patients, those with head and abdominal wounds and those with multiple gunshot wounds,’ she said.   There were still many patients to treat and she headed back to work along with three other CARE nurses and four CARE clinical officers.

Area Program Coordinator Benson Wakoli said, ‘Rose immediately took action caring for the most critically wounded, struggling to keep them alive while they await medevac to a hospital in the national capital, Juba, or the arrival of a mobile surgical team. Our clinical officers and nurses have focused on treating life-threatening injuries and significantly augmented the clinic’s capacity.’

‘This teamwork has saved many lives,’ he added. ‘Our Rose has been the Nightingale of the clinic.’

Donate to CARE’s Global Emergency Fund

Find out more about CARE’s work in South Sudan

Vanuatu: A future for Futuna

2014 March 31
by careaustralia

by Mala Silas, climate change field officer with CARE International in Vanuatu

Around the world, the climate is changing.

Here in Vanuatu, the ocean has been getting warmer and more acidic. Scientists are predicting that cyclone patterns will change, we’ll see heavier rainfalls, a wetter wet season and a drier dry season. We’re already seeing the sea rising six millimetres per year in the capital, Port Vila; higher than the global average. For many people, the ocean rising by a few centimeters doesn’t sound like much, but for those of us living in small island nations like Vanuatu, it will mean the waves are coming higher than ever during storms; changes to where and how we get our food; and fishermen, farmers and growers face more uncertainty.

People wait for emergency assistance in the Philippines after Typhoon Ketsana. Photo: Ies Aznar/CARE

People wait for emergency assistance in the Philippines after Typhoon Ketsana. Photo: Ies Aznar/CARE

The UN has today published a report on climate change impacts around the world. Put together by hundreds of the world’s leading scientists, the report indicates a tough future for us here in Vanuatu. This is the most comprehensive scientific report produced about the impacts of climate change, and it shows that climate change is happening and, so far, countries like Vanuatu aren’t ready for it.

Last week I was on the island of Futuna, a place that, even by Vanuatu standards, is quite remote. There are no roads (just rugged footpaths) and only a couple of boats to get between communities. There’s little or no mobile reception and poor radio coverage. People in Futuna mostly rely on the land and the ocean for their food, and their water comes from natural springs which are a long walk from home. In dry times, water is harder to find, and in floods, the soil runs off the gardens, and with more erratic weather and a rising sea, the job of growing or gathering food is becoming tougher. It’s particularly tough for women in Futuna; they are often isolated by cultural traditions that keep them at home and silent in community meetings.

VIETNAM - In Sept. 2005, Typhoon Damrey crossed east Vietnam with winds of more than 100/kph. Only Hau Loc District, escaped extensive damage. This is attributed to a belt of mangrove forests which play an essential role in preventing soil erosion and which also protected dykes by slowing down the force of the storm waves. CARE works in this area on a Community-Based Mangrove Reforestation and Management Project that focuses on livelihood diversification, reforestation of extensive mangrove areas and sustainable, participatory management as key aspects of protecting vulnerable communities from the physical and economic impacts of disasters.  The villagers themselves work together to plant and maintain the mangrove forest with the support from CARE. This project was successful because the villagers participated with valuable ideas and solutions on how to plant and care for the mangroves. They worked hard to remove by hand barnacles, small shells, which kill the mangrove trees. ©CARE/Hoang Gai Hai Hoang 2009;

CARE works in Hau Loc District, Vietnam on a project that focuses on reforestation of extensive mangrove areas as a way of protecting vulnerable communities from the physical and economic impacts of disasters. ©Hoang Gai Hai Hoang/CARE

With CARE, I’ve been involved in a project to help the people of Futuna build home gardens to bring them more food that can handle changing weather patterns and diseases. Before the project, the people of Futuna mostly ate boiled fish and boiled cassava (a root vegetable common in the Pacific). If they wanted to eat any other vegetables, they had to send money (which was, of course, hard to come by) to islands many hours away by boat. As well as helping to introduce these new, durable crops, CARE has run classes on food storage and cooking (using traditional and modern methods). This means families on Futuna will have food all year-round, and they are no longer relying on just one or two types of food. Despite the cyclones that frequently pass across Vanuatu, the communities of Futuna are now much more resilient, because they know how to store and preserve food and protect the fresh water they have.

Mala Silas is involved in a project to help the people of Futuna in Vanuatu build home gardens to bring them more food that can handle changing weather. patterns and diseases. ©CARE

Mala Silas is involved in a project to help the people of Futuna in Vanuatu build home gardens to bring them more food that can handle changing weather. patterns and diseases. ©CARE

Many families on Futuna now have gardens next to their houses. They grow vegetables like cucumber, carrot and tomato. Jeannine Roberts, a mother of four from Futuna’s Mission Bay, told me that her children are now eating more and are much healthier, because they’re eating more than just boiled fish and cassava.

When I first arrived on Futuna a few years ago, I wouldn’t have seen a woman stand up or speak during a community meeting; they were too shy and didn’t seem comfortable getting involved. When I was back in Futuna again last week, I was reminded of the progress that’s already been made. Seeing the women standing up to talk – even challenging the men – was something very special. These inspiring women have plenty of knowledge about their local environment, gardens and households, and I feel lucky to be working with them to improve their lives and break down many cultural and social barriers.

Futuna is just one small island among hundreds across Vanuatu and hundreds of thousands across the Pacific. But the progress there – achieved through teamwork and giving women a voice – is a great example of what can be achieved in the face of a changing planet.

Mala Silas is a climate change field officer with CARE International in Vanuatu. She works with the team on Yumi stap redi long climate change (The Vanuatu NGO Climate Change Adaptation Program) which is supported by CARE, Oxfam and the Australian Aid program.

Climate change and drought-resistant crops in PNG

2014 March 26

by Lyrian Fleming-Parsley, CARE Australia

Jonathan and Julie Jonas are a typical family from the remote Eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea (PNG). Together they have three children and are farmers, cultivating land on the village slopes. Lately, Jonathan and Julie have noticed the climate changing around them, with a potential increase in drought, which they are very concerned about.

’1997 was the last really big crisis here when there was a big shortage of food and people had to go into the bush to find food. We’ve been listening to the news that is going around and we hear there will be another crisis and we are scared,’ says Julie.

CARE is helping farmers in PNG prepare for changing weather conditions by planting drought-resistant crops and adapting farming methods.

CARE is helping farmers in PNG prepare for changing weather conditions by planting drought-resistant crops and adapting farming methods. ©Josh Estey/CARE

Due to El Nino/La Nina climate factors, drought is a constant possibility in PNG. CARE is helping local farmers prepare for the possibility of changing weather conditions by planting drought-resistant crops and adapting current farming methods to cope with times when less water may be available. Part of this project involves supplying farmers with a new variety of hardy yam seeds.

‘The yam seeds were distributed by CARE staff. They give us the seeds and we plant them and when we harvest them we will give them [the seeds] to other families for them to plant.’

‘We got training on how to grow the seeds… The yams can be stored over a long period of time and also grow in dry seasons, that’s why they are distributed to us. They also taught us how to plant the seeds and what to do before putting the seeds into the ground like mulching,’ explains Jonathan.

CARE supplied Julie and Jonathan with yam seeds, and provided training on how to grow and store yams.

CARE supplied Julie and Jonathan with yam seeds, and provided training on how to grow and store yams. ©Josh Estey/CARE

‘We had training in where to plant our food during a dry season. We should plant it near the river so it is easy to water the plants during dry seasons, or we use bamboo to divert water into the gardens and supply water to the plants,’ he says.

As well as yams, Jonathan and Julie also grow sweet potato, tomato, peanuts and green vegetables, which provides food for the family. Like most local families, the Jonas’ earn a meager income from growing coffee, but this is seasonal and the cost of transporting the coffee to market is very expensive and takes away most of the profit.

When asked if he feels confident the preparations they are making for the dry season will be enough, Jonathan says ‘I still feel I’m not well prepared if there is another dry season [like 1997]. To help myself I will use the methods of diverting water from the bush and planting near the river…but I still don’t feel confident to survive a disaster like that.’

Clearly, waiting for the unknown is hard and Jonathan and Julie are worried about how their family will make it through another severe dry season. But with more tools and preparation than the family has ever had before, they are in a better position than ever to survive the next drought if and when it does come.

Learn more about CARE’s work in PNG

Snapshot #3: Walk In Her Shoes 2014

2014 March 24

Yesterday, thousands of Australians finished their last day of CARE’s Walk In Her Shoes Challenge. We can’t thank you enough for walking to support women and girls living in poverty!

Here are some of our incredible participants counting their kilometres over the weekend.

jillyfii, via Instagram

‘Walking for a great cause! Less than halfway to go on my 50km journey #CAREWIHS @careaustralia’ – jillyfii, via Instagram

little_raskal, via Instagram

‘Proud #GirlGuide walking on at the United Nations #CSW58 for #CAREWIHS!’ – little_raskal, via Instagram

monfrique, via Instagram

‘Myself and @harlottewars doing our bit for charity by walking 100km to raise money for Women in poverty. We’ve raised $700 so far. If you want to support the cause let me know! Beautiful views around Sydney today… #WIHS #walkinhershoes #CARE #WIHS2014′ – monfrique, via Instagram

serenanoble_, via Instagram

‘Such a beautiful place to go for a walk even when it’s cloudy! More than half way through the Walk In Her Shoes Challenge! If you’d like to sponsor me to help improve the lives of women and girls living in poverty overseas please click on the link in my profile. Every little bit counts! #CAREWIHS @careaustralia #portdouglas #fourmilebeach’ – serenanoble_, via Instagram

natmyers44, via Instagram

‘#CAREWIHS#8.54km#walk#dog #happy#exercise’ – natmyers44, via Instagram

courtneywishart, via Instagram

‘It might be a chilly Melbourne morning; but while you’re rugged up in bed @careaustralia and @thebodyshopaust hit the tan #CAREWIHS #womensempowerment #walkingchallenge #gettingmystepsin #atthetan’ – courtneywishart, via Instagram

k_abell, via Instagram

‘#CAREWIHS day six: walked 8.5km in 40 degree heat and became the sweatiest person alive. Then ran some crazy amount at the gym. Brought up 32km for the day, thanks to a super dodgy pedometer!! Sitting on something like 130km for the week. About to go pump out the last 20km. #care #walkinhershoes #100kmweek’ – k_abell, via Instagram

khof_87, via Instagram

‘#carewihs #carewihs25km #carewalkinhershoes #smashingit #29.72km #done #onedaytogo #12wbt #oneactive #productivesaturday’ – khof_87, via Instagram

hayleylj, via Instagram

‘Last day of ‘Walk in Her Shoes’ today. Donations can still be made up until the 30th of April if you would like to support the cause! Link on my profile @careaustralia #CAREWIHS’ – hayleylj, via Instagram

Learn more about Walk In Her Shoes

CARE for Syria: A marathon effort by CARE’s Dead2Red team

2014 March 24
by careaustralia

On 13 March, three years after the beginning of the crisis in Syria, a CARE team of ten runners participated in the famous ‘Dead2Red’ marathon in Jordan. Their goal: to raise awareness and funds for the plight of millions of Syrian refugees.

The CARE team consisted of CARE emergency staff and five Syrian refugees who volunteer in CARE’s urban refugee centres. They proudly finished the 242 kilometres from the Dead Sea to the Red Sea in 22 hours and 23 minutes. Defying sand storms, exhaustion and the dark, they raised US$25,775 for CARE’s emergency work for Syrian refugees.

Meet the incredible team …

Omran, 24, lawyer and Syrian refugee

Omran. (Photo: CARE/Wolfgang Gressmann)

Omran, a 24-year-old Syrian refugee, ran Dead2Red for his mother. ©CARE/Wolfgang Gressmann

‘I looked at the beautiful landscape around me, the mountains, the sea and the desert. Despite all the beauty, horrible memories crossed my mind during the run. I thought about my mother, remembered how she was shot in the head while sitting next to me. My legs became cold for a few seconds and I slowed down for a moment. Sadness overtook me. But I wanted to be stronger and faster than the bullet that took her from me. And I was.’


Omar, 27, college graduate in architecture and Syrian refugee

Omar and his reason to run from the Dead to the Red Sea. ©CARE/Wolfgang Gressmann

Omar and his reason to run from the Dead to the Red Sea. ©CARE/Wolfgang Gressmann

‘It was a very challenging, but wonderful experience. I feel that I found a new family. I learned how much is possible if we care for each other and work as a team. After finishing this race I know that nothing in life is impossible. I hope the next marathon can take place in Syria. I am definitely ready for it!’


Maram, 21, economics student and Syrian refugee

Maram ran Dead2Red for Syrian university students. ©CARE/Wolfgang Gressmann

Maram ran Dead2Red for Syrian university students. ©CARE/Wolfgang Gressmann

‘I thought about all the people who lost their lives. But I also thought about the ones who survived and that I want to run as fast as possible so their lives can be saved. The great support we received from everyone kept me going. I felt like the shadows of thousands of people followed me through the race, ran next to me and protected me from the rain, the wind and the cold.’

 

Eman Kathib, 34, CARE Jordan and part of the support team during the race

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Eman from CARE Jordan was part of the support team during the Dead2Red Marathon. ©CARE

‘At one moment, in the middle of the night, I asked myself: What in the world am I doing here? But then I saw the determination in the eyes of the team members, I heard them talk about why they run. I thought about the people who were killed, those who have lost their family members, their homes. It was as if the souls of the dead surrounded us in the desert.’


Amal, 28, teacher from Yarmouk Camp

amal.jpg

Amal, a teacher, ran from the Dead to the Red Sea for Syria. ©CARE/Wolfgang Gressmann

‘There are some things in life that become a very special part of our memories. Destined to never be forgotten, always present in our heart and soul, as real today as the day they actually happened. What a great experience it was to run the Dead2Red marathon! It was so intense, so silent and noisy at the same time. For some reason it is just as easy to cry as it is to smile.’


Saif, 27, CARE Jordan’s psychosocial expert

Saif and his reason to run the Dead2Red marathon. ©CARE/Wolfgang Gressmann

Saif and his reason to run the Dead2Red marathon. ©CARE/Wolfgang Gressmann

‘The race for me was absolutely an epic journey. The most difficult part was to maintain faith in my personal physical abilities and to resist the temptation of choosing the easy way out, to quit and just drive home. But the support the team received from people throughout the world who simply understood why we were doing this despite all the challenges outbalanced everything else.’


Alexandra, 35, Deputy Country Director Program, CARE Lebanon

Alexandra from CARE Lebanon ran for the world's attention. ©CARE/Johanna Mitscherlich

Alexandra from CARE Lebanon ran for the world’s attention. ©CARE/Johanna Mitscherlich

‘Above all, the race has taught me one thing: we should never underestimate ourselves and our ability to challenge our physical and mental limits. Whenever I think something is impossible in the future, I will look at the pictures of this race and remember that we are all capable of achieving great things together.’


Chris Wynn, 29, Senior Program Officer, CARE Australia

IMG_1468_580

Chris Wynn from CARE Australia only joined the Dead2Red team a day before the event after a team member dropped out. ©CARE

‘When dawn was breaking, our team’s spirit changed. We could readily perceive how far we had come and the progress we were making. We sang improvised songs and cheered for each other. Smiles replaced the looks of expressionless exhaustion. In the end, knowing that we have gone the distance for millions of Syrians in need numbed the pain of our sore muscles.’


Johanna Mitscherlich, 28, Regional Emergency Communications Officer

johanna.jpg

Johanna ran Dead2Red for the Syrian Volunteers. ©CARE/Wolfgang Gressmann

‘Millions of Syrian refugees have been facing new ground and unexpected challenges for months, even years … When I was running through sand and darkness in the desert, I thought about how devastating it must feel to be on a journey without knowing whether you would ever reach the finish line, without knowing what will happen after you reach it. And to realise that the starting point of your journey might not exist anymore if you ever make it back there.’

Donate to CARE’s Syrian Refugee Crisis Appeal

Find out more about the Syrian Refugee Crisis

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